Career News

CAE expects pilot job market to recover by late 2021

LONDON - Flight training provider CAE expects a robust return of pilot demand as early as late 2021. According to its recently updated market outlook, the global airline pilot population will grow from 333,000 in 2019 to 426,000 by 2029 - with a wave of retirements brightening career prospects for young pilots.

 

CAE market outlook 2020

Covid-19 turned to pilot job market from boom to gloom as airlines are forced to keep their fleets grounded furlough staff. Yet, the Canadian flight training provider sees limited long-term effects of the current crisis on pilot career prospects.

"CAE’s analysis shows that the fundamental factors influencing pilot demand prior to the Covid-19 outbreak remain unchanged", the company writes in its recently updated market outlook. "Age-based retirement and fleet growth were, and are expected to remain, the main drivers of pilot demand."

CAE investigated market data as airlines and operators are navigating the current downturn in passenger air travel and are pursuing recovery strategies following the outbreak of the global pandemic.

"Acute demand" for 27,000 new pilots

While the demand for pilots has decreased significantly during 2020, the CAE analysis expects the active pilot population is expected to return to 2019 levels in 2022.

"This is expected to drive an acute demand for pilots, resulting in an estimated short-term need for approximately 27,000 new professional pilots starting in late 2021," CAE said. Among the 333,000 active airline pilots of 2019, 126,000 will retire in this decade. CAE expects industry growth to add another 93,000 airline pilots jobs to the global total by 2029. (2020/11/19, Text: aero.uk, Image: CAE)

 

 

 

Lufthansa keeps flight students grounded through 2020

PHOENIX - Lufthansa flight school EFA suspends all training operations "at least" until 2021 citing a second spike of Covid-19 cases in the U.S. and dire mid-term career prospects for cadet pilots. Yet, EFA remains "convinced" that job market perspectives for pilots will eventually improve along with industry recovery.

European Flight Academy

"Lack of pilot demand and operational adjustments": EFA will keep its pilot training courses closed through 2020. Students complete some parts of flight training in Arizona, but the "rapid spreading" of Covid-19 cases in southern U.S. is only one of the reasons for EFA to extend its shutdown.

Covid-19 fallout on aviation turned the pilot job marked form shortage to surplus within months and Lufthansa needs to adapt. "Group airlines will have no demand for new pilots in the forseeable future," EFA said in a statement to aero.uk.

About 800 students are currently enrolled with EFA. The school will not start any new courses for the time being and discuss options for a "free termination of training contracts" with students who want to reconsider their career choices and leave the programme.

Yet, it is not all gloom and doom. "We remain convinced that market demand will pick up again in the long term and this will improve career prospects for pilots," EFA said. "However, we expect that it will take several years for the international aviation industry to recover to pre-crisis levels." (2020/07/10, Image: European Flight Academy)

 

 

Job alternative: With RailTest® from pilot to train driver

In COVID-19 crisis, many pilots have to be creative when looking for a job and have to choose jobs also outside the aviation industry. One option is to switch from the air to the rail, to start as a lateral entrant as train driver after several months of training. Railway companies in the whole world have hundreds of vacancies in their cabs.

Also train drivers must pass psychological-diagnostic performance checks. To prepare for these aptitude tests, SkyTest® is launching the new RailTest® product line, to practise appropriate tests in advance. Further information on RailTest® are available at www.railtest.com (2020/05/08).

 

RailTest-ICE-1

 

 

 

Pilot unions vow to fight contractor schemes

LONDON - Covid-19 shakes the pilot job market. While government furlough and short-time work schemes protect airline staffers from immediate redundancies, one group faces unemployment: contract pilots. According to pilot union ECA one out five European pilots works in an atypical framework.

"Agreement terminated", "your services no longer required", "your last salary may not be paid". This is what thousands of technically self-employed contractor pilots and cabin crew have been told by airlines or staffing agencies over the past few weeks.

"Atypical employment in aviation is merely a smokescreen for regular employment with the attached responsibilities ignored," says ECA President Jon Horne. "We have often warned that these broker agency set-ups and bogus self-employment schemes create a pool of disposable workers with diminished rights and no access to labour laws."

PilotUnion

"Experience vacuum"

In the eyes of ECA, the current crisis is a "wake-up call" that "killed the last argument that the contractor model could be in some way good" for pilots. "Any national or EU financial aid or support to airlines must be made conditional on socially responsible behaviour and acting in the public interest."

 

In April, Norwegian Air closed crewing agencies effectively sending 1.570 pilots and 3.130 cabin crew into unemployment. CAE Crewing Services started a dismissal process for Spanish crews of SAS Ireland.

According to an ECA estimate, nearly one out of five European pilots is on a precarious contract. With young pilots the rate comes in even higher at 40 percent.

"Right now, we see airlines with sufficient liquidity laying off atypically employed aircrew workers, just because it is easy to do so", says ECA General ECA Secretary General Philip von Schöppenthau. "Even experienced pilots will simply not manage to find a job, leaving an experience vacuum which will take years to rebuild." (2020/05/04, Image: Norwegian Air, symbolic)

 

 

 

United Airlines buys flight school Westwind

PHOENIX - United Airlines expects to hire more than 10,000 pilots throughout the 2020s. The U.S. industry behemoth ventures into flight training to hedge its cockpit staffing needs.

Demographics were in key driver behind United`s decision to buy Phoenix-based Westwind School of Aeronautics as half of its pilots will turn or apporach 65 by 2029 - the mandatory retirement age for pilots flying in the United States.

Westwind - rebranding as "United Aviate Academy" is expected to churn out more than 300 young pilots into United`s fleets in its first year of operation under the new owner.

United Airlines Boeing 737-900ER

"The United Aviate Academy will give the airline more visibility and direction over the recruitment, development and training of future pilots, enabling United to increase the percentage of women and minorities who become pilots," United said in a statement. The airline will facilitate financing for its academy`s students. (2020/02/06, Image: Boeing)



JetBlue Airways looking for pilot talent

NEW YORK - JetBlue Airways is closing in on 2019 admissions to its flight training program "Gateway Select" - the fast track to a cockpit job with the airline.

JetBlue-Crew


JetBlue Airways became the first major American airline to venture into ab initio pilot training in 2017 with its "Gateway Select" courses. After completing initial flight training and an "airline preparation course", students will work at CAE flight training as instructors to collect 1,500 flight hours - an FAA requirement for all airline pilots - before joining JetBlue Airways as First Officers.


"Gateway Select" tuition is 110,000 US Dollars. Yet, JetBlue Airways provides financing through Wells Fargo and US Credit.


The 2019 application window closes September 20th.
Admission to the program is subject to a successful participation in an online and on-site assessment process. The 3,5 year "Gateway Select" program is open to applicants who are eligable to work in the US and will be at least 23 years of age upon completion. (2019/09/10, Image: JetBlue)


Meet SkyTest and SkyJobs at Be a pilot Screening Day 2019

Be-a-pilotAir traffic growth stimulates pilot demand among airlines. While airline-mentored ab initio programs return to the flight training market, independent flight schools offer alternative and attractive paths into the industry.

SkyTest will co-host Be a pilot Screening Day 2019 in Frankfurt/M, Germany - a one-day venue with an FTO exhibition site and expert presentations on the current flight training landscape.

Date: Oct. 12th 2019, 10.00 - 17.00
Place: The Squaire, Frankfurt Airport, Germany
Website: www.screeningday.de (German)
Tickets: en.xing-events.com/UEESHTB.html

Ryanair taps flight training market to attract new pilots

LODZ - Ryanair ventures into ab initio pilot training. Polish FTO Bartolini Air will train up to 300 cadets on behalf of Ryanair over the course of the next four years.

 

Ryanair adds ab initio flight training to its pilot training and supply strategy. Bartolini Air won a Ryanair mandate to train cadets at its Lodz facilities for the airline. According to a Ryanair statement the "Air Mentored Pilot Training" programme will process 300 future pilots through 18 months of "intensive" flight training, a Boeing 737 type-rating and Ryanair cockpit job.

 

 

"Being recognized by Europe’s leading airline is a milestone for Bartolini Air. It undoubtedly proves the quality of our training and the high level of skills of our cadets," said Bartolini Air CEO Izabela Konopinska. The FTO will start accepting applications in the next few weeks.

 

Like all European airlines Ryanair faces a hiring bottleneck caused by an industry-wide pilot shortage. Ryanair expects to hire up to 1,000 new pilots every year until 2024 to support fleet and network growth plans. (2019/07/22, Image: Ryanair)

 

 

Turkish Airlines to accept cadets up to 30

ISTANBUL - Turkish Airlines still has some spots to fill in its 2019 ab initio flight training programme. While some restrictions apply, the airline will accept applications from potential cadets up to the age of 30 years.


Turkish Airlines is looking for future First Officers. The airline invites Turkish citizen or blue card holders with certain qualifications to apply for flight school enrollment by August 30th 2019. Admission is subject to a successful participation in an evaluation process that includes an English test, health check, CRM test, job interview and an DLR pilot aptitude screening.


We recommend SkyTest® Preparation Software for DLR 1 Screening to prepare for the aptitude tests - discounts are available on request. (2019/06/19, Image: Turkish Airlines)

Turkish Airlines


WDL Aviation and LGW consolidate pilot recruitment

HAMBURG - German wet-lease operators WDL Aviation and LGW consolidate their pilot recruitment and screening process with Interpersonal.

 

Zeitfracht completed the acquisition of LGW from Lufthansa Group (Eurowings) in April 2019. Along with WDL Aviation the Berlin-based logistics company now operates two airlines with a mixed wet-lease fleet of Embraer E190, BAe 146 and Bombardier DHC8 aircraft.

 

Eurowings-Q400

 

Current Zeitfracht pilot vacancies include Captain and First Officer assignments within the Embraer and BAe fleets at the Cologne base of WDL Aviation and First Officer assignments within the LGW Dash 8 fleets based in Dusseldorf and Stuttgart. Pre-hiring screenings for both Zeitfracht airlines are arranged by Interpersonal in Hamburg.

 

We recommend SkyTest® Preparation Software for IP-BQ (Basic Qualification) to prep for the aptitude tests of the multi-stage screening process. (2019/05/02, Image: Eurowings)

 

 

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